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Board of Directors

Chief Executive Officer
Christopher B. Duro

Chief Financial Officer
Edward Duro

Secretary
Henry W. Duro

                     

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Christopher B. Duro Graduate Fellows 

2010-2011    2011-2012

 

The Christopher B. Duro Graduate Fellowship and the Southern California Tribal Education Institute are proud to present the 2011 Duro Fellows: 

 

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Connie L. FileSteel

Connie L. FileSteel is a member of the White Clay and Assiniboine Tribes of Montana. She is currently pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree at Penn State University in Educational Leadership, with a research emphasis in Tribal Control of Indian Education. Connie has a strong desire to attain systemic reformation improvements within American Indian Education through leadership, research-related work, and advocacy on a state and national level.




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Standing Bear (Brad) Kroupa

Standing Bear (Brad) Kroupa is currently working towards his doctorate in Socio-Cultural Anthropology (major), History of Education (minor) and Native American and Indigenous Studies (minor) at Indiana University. His research interests include: cultural history, cultural change and continuity, and Native education. Kroupa is also a language activist who is taking on the work of revitalization in a critically endangered language community. He has assisted and directed several language workshops for the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara.




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Adrienne Keene

Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation) is a third year doctoral student in Culture, Communities, and Education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. Her research focuses on college access for Native (American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian) students and the role of pre-college access programs in student success, with the ultimate goal of increasing educational outcomes for Native students. She is also interested in the impact of cultural appropriation and stereotypical representations of Native peoples in everyday life.




emma

Emma Elliott

Emma Elliott is honored to represent Cowichan Tribes on Vancouver Island, British Colombia. She is continuing her research in the documentation of the loss and retention of Indigenous languages. Her cultural, economic and educational experiences have prepared her for the task of exploring cross-cultural relationships, issues and identity while giving voice to underrepresented communities. Research as a means to achieve social, economic, and political goals is vital for her as she strives to make a difference in indigenous communities.



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Leon Peralto

Leon No'eau Peralto was born and raised in Waiākea Uka in Hilo, on the island of Hawaiʻi. Currently, he is pursuing a M.A. at the Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, where he also works as a graduate research assistant on the Kamakakūokaʻāina Ancestral Visions of ʻĀina Project Team. Actively engaged in community-based research and activism in his home community on the island of Hawaiʻi, his passions are mālama ʻāina (natural & cultural resource stewardship), and his goal is to deepen his knowledge of the history, culture, and language of our people, so as to better prepare himself to serve the community and ʻāina from which he was born, in our movement towards social and political decolonization and transformation.

 


Leon No‘eau Peralto was born and raised in Waiākea Uka in Hilo, on the island of Hawaiʻi. Currently, he is pursuing a M.A. at the Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies, where he also works as a graduate research assistant on the Kamakakūokaʻāina Ancestral Visions of ʻĀina Project Team. Actively engaged in community-based research and activism in his home community on the island of Hawaiʻi, his passions are mālama ʻāina (natural & cultural resource stewardship), and his goal is to deepen his knowledge of the history, culture, and language of our people, so as to better prepare himself to serve the community and ʻāina from which he was born, in our movement towards social and political decolonization and transformation. 

 

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